Glasshouse Mountains: Queensland, Australia

gratisaustralisAustralia, Australia 2017, Queensland

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Approximately an hour’s drive north of Brisbane, one finds the Glasshouse Mountains.

Named by Captain Cook,

they were created some 25 million plus years ago as the country passed over the hotspot now situated at the northern tip of Tasmania, the erosion of time has produced this awe – inspiring sight of rocks soaring above the plains below.

Lava plugs were created as liquid rock filled tiny openings beneath the outer surface, and set within the volcanic cone, hardening as it cooled to become the rocks, trachyte and rhyolite.

Over time, the softer sandstone encasing the cones’ outer extremities has eroded, thereby leaving the plugs exposed.

Well known names such as those of Leichhardt and Flinders passed explored the climes.

Travelling through the region, a variety of vegetation

and animals

unique to the habitats that exist here can be found if you know what to look for.

Four wheel driving is possible, although we had no intention of partaking in that experience this day, or so we thought.

Not too bad to start with as we passed through pine forests,

however that soon changed, we discovered.

Careful palnning was required.

That aside, this was a true experience, and one day is not enough time.

 

https://www.npsr.qld.gov.au/parks/glass-house-mountains/

Wellington Point to King Island Walk: Queensland

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We undertook the 40 minute drive to Wellington Point in order to partake in the 2km round journey walk across to King Island at low tide.

With the ebbing of the tide, a sandy causeway becomes visible, allowing the explorer to amble across the tiny mangrove surrounded island.

Crabs played games of hide and seek.

Sead coral was washed ashore,

and the rocky mudflats held hidden treasures for a child.

Signs placed upon the island provided some background.

Mangrove roots were everywhere.

Once inhabited by the Philips family during the early 1900s, today, the region is a conservation park.

Back on shore, there was a children’s playground

and the ibis came to call.

 

With a changing tide, this was a place where conditions were never the same twice, as we found on a second visit a few days later.

It was time for the dogs.

 

Botanical Gardens, Mt Coot – Tha, Brisbane: Queensland, Australia

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Bob and I thoroughly enjoyed our time here with the grandchildren.

Well set up for the youngsters, a treasure hunt along the childrens’ pathway kept them occupied

There was plenty to look for.

This was a Floss Silk Tree: quite interesting.

This was a hit!

and the vegetable garden was great for their sense of smell.

https://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/facilities-recreation/parks-venues/parks/brisbane-botanic-gardens-mount-coot-tha

Nundle: New England, New South Wales

gratisaustralisAustralia, Australia 2017, New South Wales

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South west of Walcha is the picturesque tiny farming town of Nundle and this was our destination this day.

Travelling upon the back roads via Woolbrook, we passed the beautiful Albaldie Nature Reserve – on this list for next time – taking in the sights of the beautiful countryside.

Just outside of the township, was the picturesque Chaffey Dam.

With rains few and far between, and water low, coming across the moving of sheep from one paddock to another, had been a regular occurence. Even in this day and age, horses are still utilised.

Once in Nundle,

a picnic was had in the tiny park. Beautifully set up, it was perfect for the young

and old.

The highlight was our visit to the small Nundle Woollen Mill, which still runs on the original equipment.

Reliques of yesteryear were dotted here and there,

whilst inside the working equipment was on view.

Homeward bound, a we took a different route along the Nundle Forest Way. We had never seen so many dead wombats – all hit by the logging trucks at a guess- and are pretty sure we sighted one of the rare wallaby species. A stop was made and we took in the view.

Halting at a planting of exquisite sycamore trees that had been planted alongside the river bed, we were treated by the chorus of the frogs.

The day was complete as we were slowed by the farmer toddling along on his aged tractor.